Fine Arts Seminar (Houghton College)

thinking critically and building community around art and design

Faculty Art Show (reposted)

Faculty art show

During the last five years I’ve picked up on the different teaching styles and artistic instruction of each of the Art Professors. I’ve needed each of their different perspectives and insight like the necessary tiles in a mosaic wall. Which is why it’s so intriguing to experience their professional works and see how they apply their teaching. Observing this show has informed my own artistic horizons, especially in the case of Baxter’s series of ceramic bowls/vessels. For a person with a concentration in ceramics, watching the process of this series from beginning to completion has inspired and given awareness to my own process. However, nothing has helped me grow as an artist than listening to how Baxter talks about his pieces and the environmental influences for most of his work. The intellectual aspect of his fish bowls resonates in my own interests. The time lapse of water evaporation is a creative way portray that time will eventually run out for endangered flora and fauna. Humanity has in their hand a button for the destruction or the renewal of creation. Some have decided to be ignorant of this concept, some are caught up in the bystander effect, and some simply don’t have the time to care. The truth is that we are stewards of the Earth and will be held responsible for how it has been looked after no matter a persons faith or religious associations. His fish bowl series is extensive and has a firm and diverse foundation of conversation reading into his pieces. The pieces themselves reflect the nature of the subject matter in all it’s regality.

Sarianne Hereld

Alex Bogs

After talking with several students, it appears that Alex Bogs created some strong reactions of all kinds. I think this is a wonderful thing, because who he is and what he does challenges people on so many levels about so many things; from his attire to his the messages he portrays in his art. His very appearance is abrupt, and then after the initial shock, whimsical and charmingly unconcerned with social constructions. My own reaction was that I was deeply moved by the sincerity and “bigger picture” of his artwork; sculptural, theatrical and musical (artistic residue comes in so many forms). There is a child-like honesty in his words and in the nature of his work that strive to touch a deeper layer of life. It asks us to confront what really matters through his bizarre and wonderfully uncomfortable mannerisms. “Art being the residue of the mind,” reflects heavily in this message of focusing on the “real” and the “permeant/immortal” aspects of being human. The residue in our lives is not, could not be more important than the driving energy behind it, more specifically, the source: our mind, heart and soul. Alex Bogs has found that and his artwork intends to point other in that direction as well so that others my Grow. Alex bogs is a walking work of Art, in a fantastic way.
Sarianne Hereld

Faculty Art Show

hcartstudent:

Faculty art show

During the last five years I’ve picked up on the different teaching styles and artistic instruction of each of the Art Professors. I’ve needed each of their different perspectives and insight like the necessary tiles in a mosaic wall. Which is why it’s so intriguing to experience their professional works and see how they apply their teaching. Observing this show has informed my own artistic horizons, especially in the case of Baxter’s series of ceramic bowls/vessels. For a person with a concentration in ceramics, watching the process of this series from beginning to completion has inspired and given awareness to my own process. However, nothing has helped me grow as an artist than listening to how Baxter talks about his pieces and the environmental influences for most of his work. The intellectual aspect of his fish bowls resonates in my own interests. The time lapse of water evaporation is a creative way portray that time will eventually run out for endangered flora and fauna. His fish bowl series is extensive and has a firm and diverse foundation of conversation reading into his pieces. The pieces themselves reflect the nature of the subject matter in all it’s regality.

Sarianne Hereld

Originally posted on Fine Arts Seminar (Houghton College):

I enjoyed seeing the art that was made by our faculty. It was interesting seeing the artist inside of each person. When you are in their classes you forget that each professor started where we are. They practiced and practiced until they were happy with the art they were producing (most of the time).

I gained so much more respect for the professors as artists and creatives. I looked at their art and wondered how they ever thought to compose it, use the colors they chose or frame it the way they did. It was a humbling and inspiring experience.

-Bridget Dowling

View original

Faculty Art Show

I enjoyed seeing the art that was made by our faculty. It was interesting seeing the artist inside of each person. When you are in their classes you forget that each professor started where we are. They practiced and practiced until they were happy with the art they were producing (most of the time).

I gained so much more respect for the professors as artists and creatives. I looked at their art and wondered how they ever thought to compose it, use the colors they chose or frame it the way they did. It was a humbling and inspiring experience.

-Bridget Dowling

Faculty Art Show

It’s always interesting to see the work of the people who teach you. I really enjoyed hearing all of the personal elements that go into each faculty members work and see how they apply what they teach.

I really connected with Professor Cooley’s work. I appreciated how he didn’t just simply display his photographs on a wall in the usual standard method. Instead he displayed his work in a way that made the photographs interact with the viewer, and vice versa. His exploration of space and light show just how much you can utilize photography in the same way you can utilize a sculpture, painting, or drawing. His installation was an art piece in of itself, and came together very cohesively with his photographs.

It made me realize that presentation is everything and can transform a piece in so many different ways. I think that’s really important for photography since photographs physically are static. To construct an installation that is interactive yet still uses the medium of photography is very interesting and is something I would like to attempt in the future.

-Hattie Burgher

Faculty Show

It’s always interesting to see the work of the people who teach you. I really enjoyed hearing all of the personal elements that go into each faculty members work and see how they apply what they teach.

I really connected with Professor Cooley’s work. I appreciated how he didn’t just simply display his photographs on a wall in the usual standard method. Instead he displayed his work in a way that made the photographs interact with the viewer, and vice versa. His exploration of space and light show just how much you can utilize photography in the same way you can utilize a sculpture, painting, or drawing. His installation was an art piece in of itself, and came together very cohesively with his photographs.

It made  me realize that presentation is everything and can transform a piece in so many different ways. I think that’s really important for photography since photographs physically are static. To construct an installation that is interactive yet still uses the medium of photography is very interesting and is something I would like to attempt in the future.

-Hattie Burgher

Evelyne Leblanc-Roberge by Carrie Parsons

I enjoyed her input on the topic of space and whether we could ever possibly “own” a space. I didn’t mind that she repeated some of her projects because they all seemed different when they were set up in new locations. It goes to show how well her installations were when they were in several places. I relate to her curiosity of the first project with the apartments and neighbors. Everyone decorates their own space differently and it fascinates me to see contrasts. I found her stop motion photography to be incredible. The moving water and portraits were something I had only ever seen in CGI and in movies. Seeing those installations up close and in person would probably be really amazing. She caught your attention and captivated it as you wonder how she did the piece. She had a sense of mystery and curiosity in her work invoked ideas to others in the class.

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